Blog Header

In: Oil



Oil pulling has been the talk of the blogger world lately and we at the Co-E1 team had to try it out. We believe in using natural remedies, all our products are natural boosters that promote wellness from your cells. So natural remedies we love. Oil pulling has been around for years. it’s an ancient Ayurvedic technique that involves swishing natural virgin oil in your mouth for 20 minutes to help improve your oral & overall health. Just like oil is good for your skin, oil is able to cut through plaque and remove toxins without harming the teeth or gums. 

The benefits are different for everyone but generally the benefits are:

– Whitens teeth (without leaving them sensitive like chemical whiteners)
– Strengthens your gums/teeth/& jaw. It helps with sensitive teeth & even has reported to help TMJ sufferers like myself.
– Prevents cavities & gingivitis. Some people even reported it helped their cavities?! I am not so sure about that one… but who knows?!
– Helps get rid of acne/ eczema/ psoriasis/ & other skin care issues.
– General body detox.
– Cures a hangover and migraine.
– Helps with sleep issues.
– Clears out your sinuses & helps allergy sufferers.
– If you have halitosis, oil pulling has been a big savior for many sufferers & your morning breath will get MUCH better.
– Helps with general pain issues.
– Manages hormonal imbalances.
– and so much more.

It’s pretty easy to do. Pick your oil, our team member here uses Organic coconut oil, but any vegetable based oil (sesamesunflower, olive) will work. Coconut oil also has anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. To do it you simply put anywhere from a teaspoon to a tablespoon of oil, depending on how much you can handle having in your mouth, and swish it around for 15-20min (no more than 20). It may sound like a long time, but if you do it while cleaning or surfing the internet it goes by fast. If you feel like your mouth is fulling up, just spit some of it out and keep going. 


Pull the oil through your teeth and make sure NOT to swallow it. Once you start the process, the oil fills up with bacteria (which is what you’re trying to get rid of), so you don’t want to swallow it. After 20 min just spit out the oil into a plastic baggy or directly into the trash. Don’t spit it down the drain cause the oil will solidify and really clog the plumbing pipes.

Our team member has been doing it for about a month now and she says: “My teeth are so much whiter, which isn’t way I even tried it so its a great benefit.The best result of all for me is I suffer from TMJ and by doing this my jaw pain has decreased! When I first tried it I spit the oil out as soon as I put it in my mouth. It freaked me out, but I kept trying and by the third day I was used to the feeling I could do it for the full 20min no problem. I went to the dentist recently and I had the best appointment I have every had. My family has a history of bad teeth, even though I brush and floss regularly, I have never gone to the dentist without multiple cavities. This time when I went I only had one! I am not a medical professional. I just researched the method, tried it, and saw that it worked for me first hand.”



Like this article? Subscribe and join our email list HERE, for monthly news letters and other health tips!

S Asokan, J Rathan, MS Muthu, PV Rathna, P Emmadi, Raghuraman, Chamundeswari.Effect of oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva using Dentocult SM Strip mutans test: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics & Preventive Dentistry. 26(1):12-7, 2008 Mar

TD Anand, C Pothiraj, RM Gopinath, et al. Effect of oil-pulling on dental caries causing bacteria. African Journal of Microbiology Research, Vol 2:3 pp 63-66, MAR 2008. (PDF Link)

HV Amith, Anil V Ankola, L Nagesh. Effect of Oil Pulling on Plaque and Gingivitis. Journal of Oral Health & Community Dentistry: 2007 ;1(1):Pages 12-18

S Thaweboon, J Nakaparksin, B Thaweboon. Effect of Oil-Pulling on Oral Microorganisms in Biofilm Models. Asia Journal of Public Health: 2011 May-Aug. (PDF)