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In: sleep

March 13, 2014

Sleepy Times



We have been told since we were children that we need to get our sleep, but just how important is sleeping for our health? 


A recent survey found that more people are sleeping less than six hours a night, and sleep difficulties visit 75% of us at least a few nights per week. A short-lived bout of insomnia is generally nothing to worry about. The bigger concern is chronic sleep loss, which can contribute to health problems such as weight gain, high blood pressure, and a decrease in the immune system.Sleep makes you feel better, but its importance goes way beyond just boosting your mood or banishing under-eye circles. Here are some reasons why you should be catching those Zzz’s! 

1. Learning and memory:
Sleep helps the brain commit new information to memory through a process called memory consolidation. In studies, people who’d slept after learning a task did better on tests later.

2. Cardiovascular health: 

Serious sleep disorders have been linked to hypertension, increased stress hormone levels, and irregular heartbeat.

Disease:

Sleep deprivation alters immune function, including the activity of the body’s killer cells. Keeping up with sleep may also help fight cancer 




3. Steer clear of depression:

A lack of sleep can contribute to depression. A good night’s sleep can really help a moody person decrease their anxiety. You get more emotional stability with good sleep.If you think the long hours put in during the week are the cause of your anxiety or impatience, sleep cannot necessarily be made up during the weekend. It’s all about finding a balance. Sleep loss may result in irritability, impatience, inability to concentrate, and moodiness. Too little sleep can also leave you too tired to do the things you like to do.

4. Lower stress:

When it comes to our health stress and sleep are nearly one and the same, and both can affect cardiovascular health. Sleep can definitely reduce levels of stress, and with that people can have better control of their blood pressure. It’s also believed that sleep effects cholesterol levels, which plays a significant role in heart disease.



5. Have a healthy weight: 

If you are thinking about going on a diet, you might want to plan an earlier bedtime too. Researchers at the University of Chicago found that dieters who were well rested lost more fat, 56% of their weight loss—than those who were sleep deprived, who lost more muscle mass. (They shed similar amounts of total weight regardless of sleep.) Dieters in the study also felt more hungry when they got less sleep.

Sleep and metabolism are controlled by the same sectors of the brain. When you are sleepy, certain hormones go up in your blood, and those same hormones drive appetite.


6. Curb inflammation: 

Inflammation is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, and premature aging. Research indicates that people who get less sleep, six or fewer hours a night, have higher blood levels of inflammatory proteins than those who get more.



7. Makes Us More Active:

A good night’s sleep will make us feel more active and alert on the following day. Energy levels after a good sleep are higher, your mental awareness is more acute and you are more likely to smile more. A restful sleep session not only feels great, but it increases our chances for another good night’s sleep next time we go to bed. 


It is hard in a busy world to get what you need to do done and then get to sleep at a decent time. Our energy products are natural, they will give you the boost and mental clarity you need to have energy through out the day but still be able to fall sleep at night. Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind, and more.